Streptococ beta-hemolitic in sarcina
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stele_pe_cer
Scris: Sunday, April 23, 2006 10:42 PM
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Inainte a ramane gravidutza, stiam ca am sterptococ grup B si nu am apucat sa il tratez.Stiu ca in sarcina nu este periculos, ci numai in momentul nasterii poate fi periculos pentru fat, provocandu-i dupa nastere meningita sau pneumonie.

Mai stiu ca se trasmite fatului prin nastere naturala, prin aspirarea secretiilor din timpul nasterii.Am inteles ca se trateaza numai cu antibiotic, lucru care scade mult imunitatea fatului, existand in primele luni de viata ale suagrului kiar riscul unei anemii severe.

Se recomanda nasterea prin cezariana sau daca se insista a naste pe cale naturala, in momentul nasterii trebuie facute perfuzii cu antibiotic de catre mama si imediat dupa anstere administrarea de antibiotic sugarului.

A tecut cineva printr-o asemena experienta?

mihaela75
Scris: Sunday, April 23, 2006 11:13 PM
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Da,eu am avut si dr. nu mi-a recomandat cezariana ci mi-a zis ca o sa-mi puna perfuzie cu antibiotic la nastere.Pana la urma tot la cezariana am ajuns ca bebele era cu capu-n sus si chiar daca n-am nascut normal tot mi-au dat antibioticul.Am vazut si la Tv ca daca travaliul e mai scurt de 12 ore, streptococul nu se transmite la fat.Streptococul asta e f.periculos dar cu un dr. bun sunt slabe sanse sa ajubga la fat.oare
stele_pe_cer
Scris: Monday, April 24, 2006 8:08 PM
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mihaela75 wrote:
Am vazut si la Tv ca daca travaliul e mai scurt de 12 ore, streptococul nu se transmite la fat.Streptococul asta e f.periculos dar cu un dr. bun sunt slabe sanse sa ajubga la fat.oare


oare o fi sugura kestia cu travaliul mai mci de 12 ore?

Tu ai facut vreun tratament pe parcursul sarcinii sau inainte de nastere?Stiu ca numai la antibiotic este sensibil domnul streptococras ...

In privinta copilul ti-au spus ceva, cum ca va trbui verificat la cateva ore de la anstere, apoi la cateva zile?
misha
Scris: Tuesday, April 25, 2006 9:13 AM
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Imi spuneti si mie care e treaba cu streptococul asta?Cum apare,daca se ia,cum se manifesta...etc?va rog mult!!!
stele_pe_cer
Scris: Tuesday, April 25, 2006 1:30 PM
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misha wrote:
Cum apare,daca se ia,cum se manifesta...etc?va rog mult!!!


Cum apare nu stiuoare ...pe nepusa masa, cand ti-e lumea mai draga.Nu prezinta manifestari ciudate, doar iese la analiza secretiei de col.

http://www.astdhpphe.org/infect/strepb.html

Streptococii sunt foarte contagiosi asa ca ar trebui sa va testati toti si sa faceti tratamentul cu antibiotice!

Cu streptococii, stafilococii...eu stiu ca se fac de la faptul ca ai consumat multe antibiotice, medicamente.

Si imunitatea are un rol foarte important la gandacii astia...asa ca intaresteti-o. Si imunitatea ti-o poti verifica daca e in regula, facand imunograma(test de laborator de sange).Pentru imunitate ar trebui sa faci niste chestii relativ simple, dar in acelasi timp foarte complicate: sa dormi destul (din cate am inteles o noapte nedormita afecteaza organismul 3 sapt sau atata ii ia sa se refaca), sa incerci sa reduci sau sa elimini stresul, sa faci un pic de sport, sa incerci sa nu bagi prea multe medicamente in tine + ai putea sa iei si imunostimulatoare.

___________________


Streptococcus
Related concepts:
Strep, Group A strep, Group B strep, Flesh-eating strep
Introduction:
These tiny bacteria look like a harmless string of pearls--at least under a microscope. In people, they wear many faces: mild discomfort, minor inconvenience, or searing tragedy.

Strep bacteria are easily killed by common antibiotics if the illness is identified and treated in time.

What is it?
There are hundreds of strains of streptococcus bacteria. The most important causes of infection belong to either Group A or Group B. Group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (called "beta strep" by many parents) are among the most common disease-causing bacteria found in children and can cause an astonishing variety of diseases. Although very sensitive to appropriate antibiotic therapy, if treatment is delayed or absent, very serious illness and even death can result.

The seriousness of the infection depends on the underlying health of the child, the amount of bacteria involved, the location of the infection, and the virulence of the particular strain causing the infection. More than 100 different types of Group A beta strep have been identified.

Group B streptococcus is a major cause of infections in newborns. The spectrum of the disease in newborns is quite broad, ranging from mild, asymptomatic infections all the way to neonatal death. (It frequently causes pneumonia.) The overall mortality rate is 10 to 20 percent. The most serious cases generally occur in premature infants, babies born to actively sick mothers, and babies who are not diagnosed and do not receive early antibiotic treatment. A pregnant woman can save her baby from illness or even death by finding out whether she's carrying Group B strep, and being treated if she is.

Who gets it?
Virtually everyone gets minor Group A strep infections.

The prevalence of severe Group A strep has waxed and waned over the years. In the past, scarlet fever was a terrible scourge. The 1980s saw a resurgence of strep-induced rheumatic fever. During the 1990s there has was a rise of severe invasive Group A strep.

Group B strep, a common inhabitant of birth canals, is present in about 20 percent (perhaps as many as 40 percent) of pregnant women. At least 98 percent of the babies born to carriers will not get Group B strep disease!

Still, somewhere between 0.5 and 2 percent of all the babies born to carriers will be affected. Several factors greatly influence the likelihood of your child being in this smaller group. Group B strep is eight times more common in premature babies than in babies born at term. Also, as one might guess, the length of time between when the bag of water breaks and when the baby is born is an important factor. If the membranes are ruptured less than 19 hours, Group B strep is very uncommon. It is more than 25 times more common when the membranes have been ruptured for 30 hours. Newborn disease is also more common if Mom is very ill, with a high fever, a tender uterus, and a high white blood cell count.

What are the symptoms?
Common Group A strep infections include those in the upper respiratory tract (often strep throat); scarlet fever (which includes skin involvement and can be very mild or extremely serious); strep pneumonia (which can also be quite serious--and is what is reported to have killed Muppets creator Jim Henson); strep skin infections (such as impetigo); strep vaginitis in prepubertal girls; and strep bacteremia (or strep in the bloodstream), which can then lead to meningitis, brain abscess, bone infections, joint infections, or even endocarditis (an infection of the valves of the heart). One type of strep is the most common bacteria that causes ear infections. Severe, invasive Group A strep (flesh-eating strep) is quite rare, but is the most feared.

Group B strep might be suspected because of temperature instability (too high or too low), poor feeding, lethargy, or difficulty feeding.
Is it contagious?
Strep is contagious until antibiotic therapy has been in place for at least 24 hours. It is spread by close contact, both via the airborne route and by touch.

How long does it last?
The length depends on the type and location of the infection. It varies widely.

Most Group A streptococcal infections are of short duration and relatively mild, but sometimes they are rapidly progressing, even life-threatening infections.

How is it diagnosed?
The presence of strep can be confirmed with a sample from the site of the infection or from a blood test.

How is it treated?
Strep can cause devastating infections, but if treated early it is uniformly sensitive to antibiotics such as the penicillins.

How can it be prevented?
Some types of strep can be prevented by vaccine.

Group A strep can sometimes be prevented by avoiding direct contact with those who have it.

Newborn infection with Group B strep can often be prevented. It is now common practice to treat high-risk carriers with ampicillin during labor. High-risk carriers are those who have had a previous infant with Group B strep disease, have Group B strep in the urine, are in premature labor, have rupture of membranes longer than 17 hours, or are ill during labor. Pretreatment with ampicillin prevents many cases of Group B strep and makes the remaining cases much less severe.

"Is it contagious?
Strep is contagious until antibiotic therapy has been in place for at least 24 hours. It is spread by close contact, both via the airborne route and by touch."


Group B streptococcus (group B strep) is a type of bacteria that causes infection among newborns, pregnant women or women after childbirth, females after gynecologic surgery, and older male and female patients with other serious diseases.

Group B strep remains the most common cause among newborns (neonates) of infection of the blood (septicemia) and of the brain (meningitis). The responsible bacterium, usually S. agalactiae, may be found most often in the vagina and rectum of females and may be transmitted sexually, as well as to a fetus as the infant passes through the birth canal.

Group B strep infection of newborns may be prevented by giving pregnant women who are carriers antibiotics through the vein (intravenously) during labor. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend that any pregnant woman who has had a baby with group B strep disease in the past, who has a bladder (urinary tract) infection caused by group B strep, or who tests positive for group B strep during pregnancy should receive antibiotics during labor.

Prevention and prompt treatment are important because group B strep infections may become life-threatening among newborns.

GBS disease is said to be early onset if it is obvious within the first week of life. It is said to be late onset if the disease is evident after the first week of life and before the end of the first three months. Those at greatest risk of GBS disease are newborn children of infected mothers, women after childbirth, females after gynecologic surgery and older male and female patients with other serious diseases.

mihaela75
Scris: Tuesday, April 25, 2006 5:09 PM
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stele_pe_cer wrote:


oare o fi sugura kestia cu travaliul mai mci de 12 ore?

Tu ai facut vreun tratament pe parcursul sarcinii sau inainte de nastere?Stiu ca numai la antibiotic este sensibil domnul streptococras ...

In privinta copilul ti-au spus ceva, cum ca va trbui verificat la cateva ore de la anstere, apoi la cateva zile?


Treaba cu travaliul e asa:Noi avem aici o emisiune numita "povesti despre nastere" unde intr-una din emisiuni era o femeie care vroia ci tot dinadinsul sa nasca acasa desi avea streptococ B.A inceput trvaliul si biata femeie s-a chinuit vreo 10 ore.Moasa vazand ca se ingroasa gluma si bebele nu vrea sa iasa a obligat mamica sa mearga sa nasca la spital ca sa-i puna perfuzia cu natibiotic.Dupa nastere ,a doua zi, moasa a venit acasa cu un test ,a intepat bebele in deget si a pus sangele pe un tester.In doua minute a iesit rezultatul, era negativ.

Tratamentul nu se face pe parcursul sarcinii ca nebunu' de strept. apare si dispare cand vrea el.De asta si testul se face cam prin sapt. 36 ( parcaoare)cand nu mai are timp sa dispara .Chiar daca ti se da anitibioticul bebele tot va fi testat dupa nastere pentru mai multa siguranta.
stele_pe_cer
Scris: Tuesday, April 25, 2006 5:24 PM
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Multumesc,Miahela...o sa ma interesez daca testarea se face si in Ro, imediat dupa nastere....
misha
Scris: Tuesday, April 25, 2006 8:14 PM
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Stelutze, multumesc ptr informatii!Chiar ma gandeam sa merg si eu luna aceasta sa-mi fac analizele.
stele_pe_cer
Scris: Tuesday, April 25, 2006 11:13 PM
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misha wrote:
Stelutze, multumesc ptr informatii!Chiar ma gandeam sa merg si eu luna aceasta sa-mi fac analizele.


Sanatate maximapupici !
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